Supersize to Superhero

Ask me anything   About Me   Dealing with POTS   My Stats and Goals   My Workouts and Diet   My Face   My Cosplay   My Progress   

25 yo, female, nerd, USA
I realized I can't be a superhero if I get winded after running a block.
I can't run with the Doctor if my legs aren't strong enough.
I can't defeat the Witch King if I can't lift a broad sword.
And unless I could fight back, I'd be one of those people who die in the first 90 seconds of an episode of Supernatural.
I'm getting healthy and fit so that when the time comes, I can save the world.

And running was a giant NOPE. Shit.

I was hoping a week and a half off would be enough to lessen my leg pain but three minutes in and I stopped. My leg started aching in the same one inch area on my inner shin right in the space between the bone and muscle. After two weeks of pain with rest and ice, regular muscle pain is looking less likely.

This is enough to officially set off worst case scenario alarm bells - I have a history of stress fractures, high pain tolerance which means I’m a bad judge of injury, and low bone density. I’m like a perfect recipe for fractures. I’m thinking it’s shine splints which usually wouldn’t be a problem for most people, but with my history, they can be.

So the next step of course would be an X-ray to see exactly what the problem is and how to treat it. Cue America’s fucked healthcare system! Since I just moved to CA and open registration for new insurance doesn’t start until November, I have no coverage in the state yet. I can’t just call in for an appointment or walk into an ER without paying an arm, a leg, and my first born child. It’s insane that the sole reason I don’t have coverage is because the government says I have to wait two months. So I actually can’t really see a doctor here.

However, I do still have coverage in PA. And it’s looking likely that I’ll be hopping on a flight back on Sunday just to see my orthopedic surgeon for this. It’s insane.

I’m so annoyed. At my chronic illness and medication for lowering my bone density, at my body for not being able to function and exercise like normal and constantly holding me back from my goals, at our healthcare system that makes it cheaper for me to fly across the country to see a doctor than to walk into the ER down the street. Normally I’d go take all my rage out in a run, but that seems to be the problem.

— 10 hours ago with 3 notes
#personal  #chronic illness 

weeping-angels-take-the-ponds:

brodinsons:

gottachasepigeons:

Testy brunettes chasing Steve 2k14

He runs the exact same way with Bucks omg

(via the-unstoppable-juggernaut)

— 12 hours ago with 45613 notes
running-elle:

mrsjonie:

5 Ways to Make Running Feel Easier: In order to burn calories and lose overall body fat, it’s necessary to skip the walks, pick up the pace, and run instead. When you’re first starting out, running feels so hard. Your muscles ache, your lungs burn, it’s hard to breathe, and all you can think about is stopping. Here are five techniques to incorporate every week to help running feel like a breeze instead of a chore. Source PopSugar.

1. Pencil It In: In order for your body to become more accustomed to the demands running places on it, you have to run regularly. Instead of fitting in random runs whenever you can or when the weather is nice, it’s imperative to stick with a weekly running schedule that includes running at least three or four times a week. Running often will strengthen the muscles in your lower body and core that are needed to make running feel easier, and it will also build your endurance. Ease into running regularly with shorter runs, and as it begins to feel easier, gradually increase the mileage per workout.
2. Slow Down: There’s no need to start off running seven-minute miles. Slow down your speed enough so you’re breathing faster than you would if just walking, but not huffing and puffing so much that your lungs hurt or you’re gasping for each breath. Skip the interval training because even though it’s great for targeting belly fat, running at a comfortable, consistent pace is easier than sprinting. Slowing down will allow you to focus on correct running form, which can alleviate common running aches, and you’ll also be able to take in the scenery or have the energy to chat with your workout buddy, all of which can actually make you love going out for a run. As your body becomes stronger, your pace will increase naturally, and you can begin to challenge it with sprinting intervals.
3. Make It Fun: If you hate every second of your run, you’re doing something wrong. Find ways to make it enjoyable either by bringing your dog or best friend along, exploring running in new places, listening to your favorite tunes or a book on tape, splurging on new gear, tracking your run with an app, or running near water so after your run you can jump in to cool off.
4. Hills and Squats: Having strong leg muscles will make running feel like a breeze. One way is to incorporate leg-strengthening work into your runs by adding hills. Running uphill will feel incredibly challenging, but as soon as you get to the top and start running on a flat surface, you’ll be amazed at how much easier running feels. Or you can focus on toning your lower bod when you’re not out for a run, with moves like squats, lunges, or step-ups, or try this yoga sequence for runners.
5. Don’t Just Run: Running regularly will train your body to make running feel easier, but if running is the only workout you do, boredom and repetitive stress injuries can make it unbearable. Mix up your cardio routine with biking, hiking, dancing, or swimming. Doing other types of cardio will strengthen your body in different ways, so every time you lace up your sneaks, it’ll feel easier to head out for a run. But the best part about taking breaks from running is that it’ll actually make you miss it, and if you’re excited to get out for a run, it’ll make it that much more enjoyable.


Some great advice!

running-elle:

mrsjonie:

5 Ways to Make Running Feel Easier: In order to burn calories and lose overall body fat, it’s necessary to skip the walks, pick up the pace, and run instead. When you’re first starting out, running feels so hard. Your muscles ache, your lungs burn, it’s hard to breathe, and all you can think about is stopping. Here are five techniques to incorporate every week to help running feel like a breeze instead of a chore. Source PopSugar.

1. Pencil It In: In order for your body to become more accustomed to the demands running places on it, you have to run regularly. Instead of fitting in random runs whenever you can or when the weather is nice, it’s imperative to stick with a weekly running schedule that includes running at least three or four times a week. Running often will strengthen the muscles in your lower body and core that are needed to make running feel easier, and it will also build your endurance. Ease into running regularly with shorter runs, and as it begins to feel easier, gradually increase the mileage per workout.

2. Slow Down: There’s no need to start off running seven-minute miles. Slow down your speed enough so you’re breathing faster than you would if just walking, but not huffing and puffing so much that your lungs hurt or you’re gasping for each breath. Skip the interval training because even though it’s great for targeting belly fat, running at a comfortable, consistent pace is easier than sprinting. Slowing down will allow you to focus on correct running form, which can alleviate common running aches, and you’ll also be able to take in the scenery or have the energy to chat with your workout buddy, all of which can actually make you love going out for a run. As your body becomes stronger, your pace will increase naturally, and you can begin to challenge it with sprinting intervals.

3. Make It Fun: If you hate every second of your run, you’re doing something wrong. Find ways to make it enjoyable either by bringing your dog or best friend along, exploring running in new places, listening to your favorite tunes or a book on tape, splurging on new gear, tracking your run with an app, or running near water so after your run you can jump in to cool off.

4. Hills and Squats: Having strong leg muscles will make running feel like a breeze. One way is to incorporate leg-strengthening work into your runs by adding hills. Running uphill will feel incredibly challenging, but as soon as you get to the top and start running on a flat surface, you’ll be amazed at how much easier running feels. Or you can focus on toning your lower bod when you’re not out for a run, with moves like squats, lunges, or step-ups, or try this yoga sequence for runners.

5. Don’t Just Run: Running regularly will train your body to make running feel easier, but if running is the only workout you do, boredom and repetitive stress injuries can make it unbearable. Mix up your cardio routine with biking, hiking, dancing, or swimming. Doing other types of cardio will strengthen your body in different ways, so every time you lace up your sneaks, it’ll feel easier to head out for a run. But the best part about taking breaks from running is that it’ll actually make you miss it, and if you’re excited to get out for a run, it’ll make it that much more enjoyable.

Some great advice!

(via 50flightsofstrong)

— 12 hours ago with 604 notes

After a week and a half off running, my shin has finally stopped hurting. I’m about to go do a test run. I suspect it’s going to be slow and involve a lot of walking, because deep leg pain still makes me nervous. Though mostly I’m annoyed it threw me off running for a week. I swear the theme of this year has been “why can’t I keep a normal running schedule?”

— 12 hours ago with 5 notes
Laying out my week of chronic illness pills is always a depressing process. This is what it takes to keep me on my feet every day. 

I take 11 pills a day, occasionally a 12th is added as needed, all but one are for helping combat POTS, and this doesn’t include things like pain killers or cold medicine that I’d take as needed. I actually used to take 14 pills at one point but that was the medication that gave me osteopenia so it was thankfully dropped.

It’s become pretty normal for me since I’ve been diagnosed for eight years so I don’t really even think about it. Every now and then though I’m struck by how not normal it is.

Laying out my week of chronic illness pills is always a depressing process. This is what it takes to keep me on my feet every day.

I take 11 pills a day, occasionally a 12th is added as needed, all but one are for helping combat POTS, and this doesn’t include things like pain killers or cold medicine that I’d take as needed. I actually used to take 14 pills at one point but that was the medication that gave me osteopenia so it was thankfully dropped.

It’s become pretty normal for me since I’ve been diagnosed for eight years so I don’t really even think about it. Every now and then though I’m struck by how not normal it is.
— 12 hours ago with 2 notes
#personal  #postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome  #pots  #chronic illness 

Tonight’s training went infinitely better than last week’s since my muscles aren’t epically dying from Lyra right now. Last week I could barely move but this week it thankfully seems like my muscles have gotten used to how they need to move for Lyra and aren’t screaming in pain anymore.

Tonight started with deadlifts, which I’d never done before. I got up to 55 lbs which didn’t feel heavy at all but I’m fine with starting out low. Then I knocked out 30 pull-ups.

The main workout was three rounds of a ten part tabata - rope slams, push-ups (which my trainer said were excellent and he was impressed I do full body ones), TRX rows, sandbag squats and throws (which lead to me going, “Jeff -.- you severely overestimate my ability to throw a sandbag across the room), burpees (least favorite ever), weighted ball tosses, weighted plank rows, lunge jumps, planks, and bike sprints.

And I finished up with some ab work - v-ups with a medicine ball and supermans.

Andddd now I’m beat!

— 1 day ago with 7 notes
#personal 

I’d given away almost all my long sleeved and full leg workout clothes when I moved to CA because it’s just too hot for them here.

Guess what’re the ideal clothes for learning Lyra?

Pro: new workout clothes.

Con: $$$

— 1 day ago with 1 note
#personal 

supersizetosuperhero:

Watch me semi-gracefully shimmy up a steel hoop. I think I’m doing ok for this only being my second time ever doing aerials.

I have a dozen new hand tears tonight but at least my knees don’t hurt nearly as much and I can still use my arms, so that’s and improvement from last week.

— 1 day ago with 20 notes